What is the ECSJ?

The European Conference of Science Journalism is a conference for professional science journalists and related professions. In addition, it is a moment in time to meet each other in real life, if that is possible, and to continue discussing the profession of science journalist.

What is the ECSJ?

Who is it for?

Everyone involved with science journalism is welcome. The event itself is aimed at science journalists and the profession. We'd also like to welcome science communicators and other closely related professions.
Membership of a European association for science journalism is not compulsory, not in the least because such associations are not active everywhere. If you live in a country with an active association but you are not a member yourself, we advise you to become a member there.

Who is it for?

Who’s Speaking

Keynote speaker: Elisabeth BikMicrobiologist and scientific integrity consultant

Elisabeth Bik is a Dutch microbiologist who was a researcher at Stanford University untill 2018, after which she became a full time science integrity consultant. She founded the blog Microbiome digest (https://microbiomedigest.com/), and is very active on twitter.

She has pioneered a ‘forensic’ approach to quality control, by painstakingly checking images, mainly in biomedical publications, for duplications and other unacceptable ways of manipulation. She has identified hundreds of papers with serious flaws, resulting in many retractions.

At ECSJ she will give the key note lecture.

Keynote speaker: Elisabeth BikMicrobiologist and scientific integrity consultant

Elisabeth Bik is a Dutch microbiologist who was a researcher at Stanford University untill 2018, after which she became a full time science integrity consultant. She founded the blog Microbiome digest (https://microbiomedigest.com/), and is very active on twitter.

She has pioneered a ‘forensic’ approach to quality control, by painstakingly checking images, mainly in biomedical publications, for duplications and other unacceptable ways of manipulation. She has identified hundreds of papers with serious flaws, resulting in many retractions.

At ECSJ she will give the key note lecture.

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Lise BarnéoudScience journalist

Lise Barnéoud is a French freelance science journalist and author specialized in medical and environmental topics. Her work has appeared among others in Le Monde, Mediapart and Science et Vie Junior. In 2021 she published the book Vaccins, petit guide par temps de Covid.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

Lise BarnéoudScience journalist

Lise Barnéoud is a French freelance science journalist and author specialized in medical and environmental topics. Her work has appeared among others in Le Monde, Mediapart and Science et Vie Junior. In 2021 she published the book Vaccins, petit guide par temps de Covid.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

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Fiona BroomEditor

Fiona is an Australian/British journalist who worked as a freelancer since 2014, reporting from South Asia and the Middle East for Al Jazeera, Mongabay, SBS Australia, Middle East Eye, and SciDev.Net. She joined SciDev.Net’s editorial team just weeks before the global COVID-19 outbreak, in February 2020.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

Fiona BroomEditor

Fiona is an Australian/British journalist who worked as a freelancer since 2014, reporting from South Asia and the Middle East for Al Jazeera, Mongabay, SBS Australia, Middle East Eye, and SciDev.Net. She joined SciDev.Net’s editorial team just weeks before the global COVID-19 outbreak, in February 2020.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

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Ilaria CianchettaEditor

Ilaria Cianchetta is the editor-in-chief of Chem Catalysis. After her PhD in chemistry she moved to Los Angeles for a postdoc at the Getty Conservation Institute and subsequently joined Cell Press as one of the inaugural editors of Chem. She has been working in publishing since 2016 and in 2020 moved to Amsterdam to lead the launch of Chem Catalysis.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Science And Science Journalism : The Gender Issue'.

Ilaria CianchettaEditor

Ilaria Cianchetta is the editor-in-chief of Chem Catalysis. After her PhD in chemistry she moved to Los Angeles for a postdoc at the Getty Conservation Institute and subsequently joined Cell Press as one of the inaugural editors of Chem. She has been working in publishing since 2016 and in 2020 moved to Amsterdam to lead the launch of Chem Catalysis.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Science And Science Journalism : The Gender Issue'.

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Rebecca ClearCommunication specialist

Rebecca Clear is the Corporate Responsibility Communications Director at Elsevier. Before joining Elsevier last year, she spent five years as head of media relations for conservation NGO WWF International. Earlier in her career, Rebecca worked with the BBC on radio news and sport publicity, and media and stakeholder communications around diversity, moving on to work in PR agencies on B2B comms, and on social issues with various non-profits. At ECSJ she will bring this experience to bear in moderating the sessions about inclusion in research and journalism.

Rebecca ClearCommunication specialist

Rebecca Clear is the Corporate Responsibility Communications Director at Elsevier. Before joining Elsevier last year, she spent five years as head of media relations for conservation NGO WWF International. Earlier in her career, Rebecca worked with the BBC on radio news and sport publicity, and media and stakeholder communications around diversity, moving on to work in PR agencies on B2B comms, and on social issues with various non-profits. At ECSJ she will bring this experience to bear in moderating the sessions about inclusion in research and journalism.

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Anne DijkstraAssistant professor

Anne Dijkstra is an assistant professor in Science Communication in Twente. She studies the changing relationship between science and society and is involved in several international projects.
At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Behind the hype'.

Anne DijkstraAssistant professor

Anne Dijkstra is an assistant professor in Science Communication in Twente. She studies the changing relationship between science and society and is involved in several international projects.
At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Behind the hype'.

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Martin EnserinkScience journalist

Martin Enserink is an international news editor at Science, based in the Netherlands.

At ECSJ he will give a 'State of science journalism' speech during the Grand finale.

Martin EnserinkScience journalist

Martin Enserink is an international news editor at Science, based in the Netherlands.

At ECSJ he will give a 'State of science journalism' speech during the Grand finale.

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Laura FortunatoResearcher

Laura Fortunato is an associate Professor in Evolutionary Anthropology at the University of Oxford. In October 2016 she launched 'Reproducible Research Oxford', a project based at the School of Anthropology and the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC).

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

Laura FortunatoResearcher

Laura Fortunato is an associate Professor in Evolutionary Anthropology at the University of Oxford. In October 2016 she launched 'Reproducible Research Oxford', a project based at the School of Anthropology and the Oxford e-Research Centre (OeRC).

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

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Roel van der HeijdenScience journalist

Roel van der Heijden has ten years of experience as a freelance science journalist. He has written for newspapers and magazines, but mostly for the popular scientific website NEMO Kennislink.

Now he has started a business as 'freelance stargazer' with a living room planetarium. He organizes stargazing sessions on the streets, during events and for people at home (www.huiskamerplanetarium.nl).

At ECSJ he will bring his self-built telescope to do some sungazing on the restaurant terrace.

Roel van der HeijdenScience journalist

Roel van der Heijden has ten years of experience as a freelance science journalist. He has written for newspapers and magazines, but mostly for the popular scientific website NEMO Kennislink.

Now he has started a business as 'freelance stargazer' with a living room planetarium. He organizes stargazing sessions on the streets, during events and for people at home (www.huiskamerplanetarium.nl).

At ECSJ he will bring his self-built telescope to do some sungazing on the restaurant terrace.

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Desiree HovingModerator

Desiree Hoving is a a program creator and moderator from the Netherlands. Previously, she worked as a science journalist for various media.

At ECSJ she will open the conference and host the session 'Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world?'

Desiree HovingModerator

Desiree Hoving is a a program creator and moderator from the Netherlands. Previously, she worked as a science journalist for various media.

At ECSJ she will open the conference and host the session 'Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world?'

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Arnout JaspersScience journalist

Arnout Jaspers is a science journalist specialising in anything that can be sensibly quantified. He has written extensively about physics, astronomy, climate, the environment, nuclear energy, mathematics and cryptography for Dutch, English and American media.

At ECSJ he will give a presentation titled 'Meaningless death counts: what the WHO gets wrong every time'.

Arnout JaspersScience journalist

Arnout Jaspers is a science journalist specialising in anything that can be sensibly quantified. He has written extensively about physics, astronomy, climate, the environment, nuclear energy, mathematics and cryptography for Dutch, English and American media.

At ECSJ he will give a presentation titled 'Meaningless death counts: what the WHO gets wrong every time'.

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Lucas KeijningScience communicator

Lucas Keijning is a freelance science communicator from the Netherlands. He uses playful formats to get people curious and investigate the world around them. He worked at NEMO Science Museum for ten years. Now he trains scientists to convey their stories in the best way, moderates events and builds chain reactions every now and then.

At ECSJ he is the quizmaster during the Grand finale.

Lucas KeijningScience communicator

Lucas Keijning is a freelance science communicator from the Netherlands. He uses playful formats to get people curious and investigate the world around them. He worked at NEMO Science Museum for ten years. Now he trains scientists to convey their stories in the best way, moderates events and builds chain reactions every now and then.

At ECSJ he is the quizmaster during the Grand finale.

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Annemarie KerkhoffModerator

Annemarie Kerkhoff is a linguist (PhD from Utrecht University) and senior researcher at Auris, an organisation for children with hearing, speech and language disorders.

She is also a freelance science writer.

At ECSJ she will be moderating the session 'Behind the hype'.

Annemarie KerkhoffModerator

Annemarie Kerkhoff is a linguist (PhD from Utrecht University) and senior researcher at Auris, an organisation for children with hearing, speech and language disorders.

She is also a freelance science writer.

At ECSJ she will be moderating the session 'Behind the hype'.

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Anne van KesselPresident of VWN

Anne van Kessel is a freelance science journalist and president of VWN (the Dutch association for science journalism and communication). At ECSJ she will be hosting the day, together with Krijn Soeteman.

Anne van KesselPresident of VWN

Anne van Kessel is a freelance science journalist and president of VWN (the Dutch association for science journalism and communication). At ECSJ she will be hosting the day, together with Krijn Soeteman.

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Ewout SteyerbergResearcher

Ewout Steyerberg is a professor of Clinical Biostatistics and Medical Decision Making at Leiden University Medical Center.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

Ewout SteyerbergResearcher

Ewout Steyerberg is a professor of Clinical Biostatistics and Medical Decision Making at Leiden University Medical Center.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

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Kai KupferschmidtScience journalist

Kai Kupferschmidt is a contributing correspondent for Science magazine based in Berlin, Germany. He writes about infectious diseases as well as food science, nutrition, evolution and science policy.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

Kai KupferschmidtScience journalist

Kai Kupferschmidt is a contributing correspondent for Science magazine based in Berlin, Germany. He writes about infectious diseases as well as food science, nutrition, evolution and science policy.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

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Heidi LedfordScience journalist

Heidi Ledford is a senior reporter at Nature, mostly covering biomedicine. She is based in London.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

Heidi LedfordScience journalist

Heidi Ledford is a senior reporter at Nature, mostly covering biomedicine. She is based in London.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

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Annique MossouBellingcat researcher

Annique Mossou is a trainer and researcher for Bellingcat. Previously she was part of an OSINT-team of the Dutch National Police, where she specialized in online jihadist propaganda. At Bellingcat, she focuses on the world of mis- and disinformation and conspiracy theories.

At ECSJ she will deliver a workshop 2 hour workshop, together with Yoeri van der Weide.

Annique MossouBellingcat researcher

Annique Mossou is a trainer and researcher for Bellingcat. Previously she was part of an OSINT-team of the Dutch National Police, where she specialized in online jihadist propaganda. At Bellingcat, she focuses on the world of mis- and disinformation and conspiracy theories.

At ECSJ she will deliver a workshop 2 hour workshop, together with Yoeri van der Weide.

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Elisa NelissenResearcher

Elisa Nelissen is PhD researcher at KU Leuven (Belgium) studying the (transcultural) circulation of COVID-19 science news.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Behind the hype'.

Elisa NelissenResearcher

Elisa Nelissen is PhD researcher at KU Leuven (Belgium) studying the (transcultural) circulation of COVID-19 science news.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Behind the hype'.

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Ochieng' OgodoScience journalist

Ochieng' Ogodo is a Kenyan science journalist writing for local and international media houses. He is the English-speaking Africa and the Middle East region winner for the 2008 Reuters-IUCN Media Awards for Excellence in Environmental Reporting.

He is a member of the Executive Board of the World Federation of Science Journalists and the patron of the Kenya Environment and Science Journalists Association (KENSJA). Ogodo is the immediate former SciDev.Net’s Regional Coordinator and Editor for Sub-Saharan Africa English Edition.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

Ochieng' OgodoScience journalist

Ochieng' Ogodo is a Kenyan science journalist writing for local and international media houses. He is the English-speaking Africa and the Middle East region winner for the 2008 Reuters-IUCN Media Awards for Excellence in Environmental Reporting.

He is a member of the Executive Board of the World Federation of Science Journalists and the patron of the Kenya Environment and Science Journalists Association (KENSJA). Ogodo is the immediate former SciDev.Net’s Regional Coordinator and Editor for Sub-Saharan Africa English Edition.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

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jacopo PasottiScience writer

Jacopo Pasotti is a science and environmental writer from Basel, Switzerland. He is specialized in environmental and social reporting from all over the world. His contributions have been published in National Geographic, GEO, Repubblica, Wired, Vanity Fair, El Pais, Deutsche Welle, Die Zeit, and Science among others.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world?'

jacopo PasottiScience writer

Jacopo Pasotti is a science and environmental writer from Basel, Switzerland. He is specialized in environmental and social reporting from all over the world. His contributions have been published in National Geographic, GEO, Repubblica, Wired, Vanity Fair, El Pais, Deutsche Welle, Die Zeit, and Science among others.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world?'

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Sergio PistoiScience journalist

Sergio Pistoi is a science writer and book author from Italy. He's written for media such as Scientific American, Reuters, the New Scientist and Nature.

Sergio PistoiScience journalist

Sergio Pistoi is a science writer and book author from Italy. He's written for media such as Scientific American, Reuters, the New Scientist and Nature.

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Alexander PleijterUniversity lecturer

Alexander Pleijter (Leiden University) is an expert in online journalism and fact checking. He is one of the coordinators of the Dutch ‘News checkers’-website www.nieuwscheckers.nl, a project that aims to help the public properly evaluate (online) news and to teach journalism students the skill of fact checking.

At ECSJ he will talk about how to recognise hoaxes and fake news in science reporting.

Alexander PleijterUniversity lecturer

Alexander Pleijter (Leiden University) is an expert in online journalism and fact checking. He is one of the coordinators of the Dutch ‘News checkers’-website www.nieuwscheckers.nl, a project that aims to help the public properly evaluate (online) news and to teach journalism students the skill of fact checking.

At ECSJ he will talk about how to recognise hoaxes and fake news in science reporting.

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Elizabeth PollitzerDirector Portia

Elizabeth Pollitzer is co-founder and Director of Portia Ltd., a London-based nonprofit organization focused on improving gender equality in science and inclusion of gender dimension in research and innovation content. She has served as "architect" of the Gender Summit since its inception in 2011, guiding its focus on gender issues in research and innovation and helping to bring together the scientists, policy makers, gender scholars and others groups in the science system.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Science And Science Journalism : The Gender Issue'.

Elizabeth PollitzerDirector Portia

Elizabeth Pollitzer is co-founder and Director of Portia Ltd., a London-based nonprofit organization focused on improving gender equality in science and inclusion of gender dimension in research and innovation content. She has served as "architect" of the Gender Summit since its inception in 2011, guiding its focus on gender issues in research and innovation and helping to bring together the scientists, policy makers, gender scholars and others groups in the science system.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Science And Science Journalism : The Gender Issue'.

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Ashani RanathungaResearcher

Ashani Ranathunga is a civil and environmental engineer and lecturer at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on utilizing industrial and agricultural waste as anthropogenic soil for soft ground improvement and mine rehabilitation. She has completed her undergraduate studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Ruhuna (Sri Lanka), did her PhD and at Monash Unversity (Australia) and was a lecturer at the University of Moratuwa (Sri Lanka).

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

Ashani RanathungaResearcher

Ashani Ranathunga is a civil and environmental engineer and lecturer at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on utilizing industrial and agricultural waste as anthropogenic soil for soft ground improvement and mine rehabilitation. She has completed her undergraduate studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering at University of Ruhuna (Sri Lanka), did her PhD and at Monash Unversity (Australia) and was a lecturer at the University of Moratuwa (Sri Lanka).

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

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Anne ScheelResearcher

Anne Scheel is a meta-science post-doc at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) in Leiden. She is interested in which research and publication practices can improve the reproducibility of the published literature, and how researchers can be encouraged to design more falsifiable and informative studies.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

Anne ScheelResearcher

Anne Scheel is a meta-science post-doc at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) in Leiden. She is interested in which research and publication practices can improve the reproducibility of the published literature, and how researchers can be encouraged to design more falsifiable and informative studies.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

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Ylann SchemmDirector Elsevier Foundation

Ylann Schemm is the Elsevier Foundation’s Director. In 2020, Ylann was appointed Chair of the Executive Council of Research4Life, a UN-publisher partnership to bridge access gaps for researchers and doctors in developing countries. In addition, Ylann is Elsevier’s VP of Corporate Responsibility. She is both American and Dutch and based in Amsterdam.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

Ylann SchemmDirector Elsevier Foundation

Ylann Schemm is the Elsevier Foundation’s Director. In 2020, Ylann was appointed Chair of the Executive Council of Research4Life, a UN-publisher partnership to bridge access gaps for researchers and doctors in developing countries. In addition, Ylann is Elsevier’s VP of Corporate Responsibility. She is both American and Dutch and based in Amsterdam.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue'.

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Krijn SoetemanScience journalist and organizer of ECSJ

Krijn Soeteman is the former president of VWN, the Dutch association for science journalism and communication, and one of the organizers of ECSJ 2022. Together with Anne van Kessel he will be hosting the day.

Krijn SoetemanScience journalist and organizer of ECSJ

Krijn Soeteman is the former president of VWN, the Dutch association for science journalism and communication, and one of the organizers of ECSJ 2022. Together with Anne van Kessel he will be hosting the day.

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Ewout SteyerbergResearcher

Ewout Steyerberg is a professor of Clinical Biostatistics and Medical Decision Making at Leiden University Medical Center.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

Ewout SteyerbergResearcher

Ewout Steyerberg is a professor of Clinical Biostatistics and Medical Decision Making at Leiden University Medical Center.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

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Adam TravisHead of Inclusion & Diversity at Logitech

Adam Travis is Head of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) at Logitech. He has worked in Helsinki, Berlin, London and Amsterdam, and in multiple industries / sectors including technology, financial services, express delivery, consulting and energy.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Science And Science Journalism : The Gender Issue'.

Adam TravisHead of Inclusion & Diversity at Logitech

Adam Travis is Head of Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) at Logitech. He has worked in Helsinki, Berlin, London and Amsterdam, and in multiple industries / sectors including technology, financial services, express delivery, consulting and energy.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Inclusion in Science And Science Journalism : The Gender Issue'.

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Fabio TuroneScience journalist

Fabio Turone is Editor in Chief of the Agency Zoe based in Milan (working for several media, covering mostly medicine and health), and Executive Director of the Centre for Ethics in Science and Journalism.

At ECSJ he will be moderating the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

Fabio TuroneScience journalist

Fabio Turone is Editor in Chief of the Agency Zoe based in Milan (working for several media, covering mostly medicine and health), and Executive Director of the Centre for Ethics in Science and Journalism.

At ECSJ he will be moderating the session 'Mending the Reproducibility crisis'.

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Bart VerheggenResearcher

Bart Verheggen is a climate scientist and teacher at Amsterdam University College. He has been an active participant in the social debate about climate change for years.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world?'

Bart VerheggenResearcher

Bart Verheggen is a climate scientist and teacher at Amsterdam University College. He has been an active participant in the social debate about climate change for years.

At ECSJ he is one of the speakers during the session 'Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world?'

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Sofie VerkestResearcher

Sofie Verkest is a science communication researcher at Ghent University, Belgium. Before stepping into research, she worked as a journalist, copywriter and science communication professional.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Behind the hype'.

Sofie VerkestResearcher

Sofie Verkest is a science communication researcher at Ghent University, Belgium. Before stepping into research, she worked as a journalist, copywriter and science communication professional.

At ECSJ she is one of the speakers during the session 'Behind the hype'.

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Jop de VriezeScience journalist

Jop de Vrieze is a freelance science and investigative journalist who followed the corona developments closely.

At ECSJ he will be moderating the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

Jop de VriezeScience journalist

Jop de Vrieze is a freelance science and investigative journalist who followed the corona developments closely.

At ECSJ he will be moderating the session 'Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal'.

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Youri van der WeideBellingcat researcher

Youri van der Weide is an open source researcher and trainer for Bellingcat. He has worked on a wide variety of topics including human rights abuses in Africa, migration in the Eastern Mediterranean, arms exports by EU countries, and research into new open source research tools and methods.

At ECSJ he will deliver a workshop 2 hour workshop, together with Annique Mossou.

Youri van der WeideBellingcat researcher

Youri van der Weide is an open source researcher and trainer for Bellingcat. He has worked on a wide variety of topics including human rights abuses in Africa, migration in the Eastern Mediterranean, arms exports by EU countries, and research into new open source research tools and methods.

At ECSJ he will deliver a workshop 2 hour workshop, together with Annique Mossou.

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Programme

Will be updated when more information becomes available.

  • Tuesday 12 July 2022
  • Wednesday 13 July 2022
  • Full programme at a glance
  • Cleveringa Auditorium
  • B017 - Room 1
  • B041 - Room 2
  • C006 - Room 3
  • Restaurant terrace (2nd floor)
  • Rijksmuseum Boerhaave
09:00 - 09:45Registration – Entrance KOG building
09:45 - 10:00Grand Opening – Cleveringa Auditorium By VWNOpening

After two days of field trips and getting to know each other, it is time to open the official European Conference of Science Journalism Leiden 2022. Or: #ECSJ2022

10:00 - 11:00Keynote: Elisabeth Bik – Cleveringa Auditorium By Elisabeth BikInvestigate Science

Science integrity will always remain a work in progress. While peer-review is a necessary first step in safeguarding the quality and integrity of scientific research, the system has been proven to be far from perfect. Elisabeth Bik has pioneered a ‘forensic’ approach to quality control, by painstakingly checking images, mainly in biomedical publications, for duplications and other unacceptable ways of manipulation. She has identified hundreds of papers with serious flaws, resulting in many retractions.

Her criticism of high-profile researchers like Didier Raoult – who claimed hydroxychloroquine cured covid-19 – has made her the target of lawsuit threats and vicious personal attacks on social media. However, she has no intention of backing down in her quest to improve science integrity.

11:00 - 17:00Sungazing – Outside, restaurant terrace 2nd floor By Roel van der HeijdenStreet astronomy

Do you enjoy the Sun? It’s hot, it’s bright and it is responsible for beautiful summer sunsets.

On closer look our star has a lot more to offer than sunbathing. At the ECSJ Roel van der Heijden (freelance science journalist) will bring his self-built telescope to investigate our closest star (weather permitting). Maybe we’ll be able to see some sunspots on the surface of the Sun, and Roel will be happy to explain how he made his telescope and how he now uses it for astronomy outreach in his living room planetarium, the ‘Huiskamerplanetarium’ (www.huiskamerplanetarium.nl).

11:00 - 11:30Coffee break – Restaurant / Exhibition area
11:30 - 12:30Mending the reproducibility crisis – B017 By Fabio TuronePanel discussion

This session will address the role of the media in discussing the issues related to the so-called “reproducibility crisis” in a constructive way. Panelists will present several critical aspects of this complex issue, and will reflect with the audience on the role that science journalists can have in helping citizens to notice not only the noise of the “falling trees” (the scandals involving lack of integrity and bad methodology) but also the much fainter noise of the growing “forest” of initiatives that are trying to fix the current system of incentives/disincentives that does not value reproducibility studies and instead often leaves room for rushed, hyped, unreliable research.

Discussion lead by Fabio Turone (Italy).

Speakers: Laura Fortunato (United Kingdom), Anne Scheel (The Netherlands), Ewout Steyenberg (the Netherlands)

11:30 - 12:30On the trail of war crimes in Ukraine – C006 Mandela RoomPresentation

A member of the Meduza.io team will show how science journalism can be an aid for war reporting. The team used chronolocation to identify murders of civilians in Bucha by Russian forces.  

11:30 - 12:30How to recognise hoaxes in science journalism – Cleveringa Auditorium By Alexander PleijterWorkshop

Alexander Pleijter (Leiden University) is an expert in online journalism and fact checking. He is one of the coordinators of the Dutch ‘News checkers’-website www.nieuwscheckers.nl, a project that aims to help the public properly evaluate (online) news and to teach journalism students the skill of fact checking. At ECSJ he will talk about how to recognise hoaxes and fake news in science reporting.

11:30 - 12:30Behind the hype: Insights from science journalism research – B041 By Annemarie KerkhoffPanel discussion

Science journalism sometimes is criticized because it contains exaggerations about the potential of specific research results. This can happen, for example, when journalistic coverage states or implies that a drug that works in animals will also work in humans before this is tested, or when unsound science is covered without information about its limitations. Journalists, press officers at universities and publishers, and researchers often point to each other as the culprit. In what has been dubbed the ‘cycle of hype’, all parties involved have their own motives for communicating about science that go beyond simply informing the public (e.g. profit or visibility).

In this session, three researchers will discuss their perspectives and study findings about science journalism, highlighting the complexities of the (international) circulation of science news and shedding more light on pitfalls and their solutions. In the second part of the session, there will be a joint discussion between the audience and the speakers, gaining insights from all three parties involved (researchers, journalists, and press officers) to feed future research and promote better science coverage in the media. 

Speakers:
Elisa Nelissen (KU Leuven)
Sofie Verkest (Gent University)
Anne Dijkstra (University Twente)

Moderator: Annemarie Kerkhoff

12:30 - 13:30Lunch – Restaurant / Exhibition area

Lunch is served in the restaurant on the second floor. While you’re there, you can head to the terrace and gaze at the sun with street astronomer Roel van der Heijden. You can find him and his self-built telescope on the terrace throughout the day.

12:35 - 13:20Lunch lecture by conference partner Universities of the Netherlands – Cleveringa Auditorium By Jacob JolijUniversities of the Netherlands

The Dutch research landscape

In conversation with Jacob Jolij.

Jacob Jolij is director of Research and Impact at the Association of Universities of The Netherlands. The Dutch research universities are known for their high quality education and research. During this lunch session you will learn more about the strength of the Dutch universities, the main research areas and the preconditions for successful science in the Netherlands. You can ask Jacob anything about the Dutch research landscape.

By our partner Universities of the Netherlands.

13:30 - 14:25Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The Gender Issue – B017 By Rebecca ClearPanel discussion

Journalists play an essential role in bringing new scientific discoveries to the public. It is essential that they have a thorough understanding of how critical research has been designed, conducted and published, asking probing questions like: has sex and gender been integrated in this research? Are there cultural blindspots in this work? Do we have data on research output by gender, race or ethnicity?

As universities, funders and scientific publishers work to create a more inclusive research ecosystem, science journalists must keep pace with key issues around representation, intersectionality, bias and methodology to gain a deeper understanding of them as contributors to quality, the intellectual potential of research, the scientific talent pool and most importantly, societal impact.

This session will explore key issues and perspectives on gender and intersectionality, to equip and challenge science journalists as they interact with and report on the research.

This session is co-organized with Elsevier.

Speakers: Elizabeth Pollitzer, Adam Travis, Ilaria Cianchetta

Moderator:
Rebecca Clear (Elsevier)

13:30 - 15:30Bellingcat workshop – C006 Mandela Room By BellingcatWorkshop

The journalism collective Bellingcat, founded by Eliot Higgins in 2014, pioneered online fact checking and open source intelligence (OSINT) methods to document, among other things, the downing of Malaysia Airlines MH17, the Skripal Poisoning, and weapons and war crimes in several wars, including the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Instructors Youri van der Weide and Annique Mossou wil deliver a 2 hour workshop detailing verification principles (verification and analysis of user generated content, such as photos and videos from social networks), maps and satellite services, and advanced OSINT search techniques.

Attention: bring your laptop. Attendance for actively participating journalists is limited to 30, workshop vouchers will be distributed on site during registration.

13:30 - 14:25Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal – Cleveringa Auditorium By Jop de VriezePanel discussion

Mostly, a science reporter zooms in on topics that are socially relevant but can be approached from a safe and comfortable distance. But a pandemic is not distant for any science reporter: we’ve all been in the middle of it. How can a science reporter work in an engaged and neutral way during such a crisis? And how desirable is it to be as neutral as possible when there is so much at stake and the science and it implications have become so value laden and political?

Speakers:  
Lise Barnéoud (Le Monde)
Heidi Ledford (Nature)
Kai Kupferschmidt (Science)
Sergio Pistoi (among others Scientific American and Reuters)

Moderator:
Jop de Vrieze

13:30 - 14:25Meaningless death counts: what the WHO gets wrong every time – B041 By Arnout JaspersPresentation

Hardly a day goes by without reading in the media: ‘Y causes X deaths per year’, where Y can be air pollution, drinking or even noise. Science journalist Arnout Jaspers will show what is fundamentally wrong with this way of quantifying diffuse health effects on a population. There are better alternatives but even major organisations like the WHO ignore this and keep reporting meaningless death counts.

14:30 - 15:30Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue – B017 By Rebecca ClearPanel discussion

Is Global South science under-reported? All too often, in the ‘Global North’, we only hear about crises happening in lower income countries, rather than coverage of the critical research being undertaken by scientists in areas that are most relevant to them. Which fields in particular are under-reported, how, and why? How does the research ecosystem and its biases play a role in this?

In this session we will explore the assumptions of, and challenges faced by, journalists from both the North and South, and possible responses.

Speakers: Ylann Schemm, Ashani Ranathunga, Ochieng Ogodo, Fiona Broom

Moderator:
Rebecca Clear (Elsevier)

14:30 - 15:30Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world? – Cleveringa AuditoriumPanel discussion

When reporting about climate science, should we use ‘global warming’ or ‘global heating’? Should we abandon all pretense of objectivity and say ‘climate disruption’ or ‘climate breakdown’ instead of ‘climate change’? Is activist climate reporting – which is now the official policy of the Guardian – exactly what the world needs, or should journalists still keep their distance from the politicised front line of climate science and its interpretations?

The speakers will debate this issue with each other, and with the audience.

Speakers: Maarten Keulemans, Bart Verheggen, Jacopo Pasotti

Moderator:
Desiree Hoving

15:30 - 16:00Tea break – Restaurant / Exhibition area
16:00 - 17:00Grand finale & Closing remarks – Cleveringa AuditoriumFinale

During this final session we get together in the large auditorium to look back on the day. During this final session we get together in the large auditorium for a “State of Science Journalism” speech by Science’s International news editor Martin Enserink. Also together we reflect on this conference day in a fun and (inter)active way lead by quiz master Lucas Keijning.

Next, there’s time to rest or do some sightseeing in Leiden. In the evening we hope to see you all for the Grand closure with drinks and bites at Rijksmuseum Boerhaave!

20:30 - 23:30Grand closure, drinks & bites – Museum Boerhaave (external location) By VWNGrand Closure

After a full conference day and maybe even two field trip days it’s time to contemplate together with your science journalist colleagues.

The closing drinks & bites will be hosted in the beautiful science museum Boerhaave with an amazing collection of ancient and modern artefacts which contributed to the advancement of science.

The museum hosts special tours during the evening.

The European Federation for Science Journalism will host two events, namely: the award ceremony for the European Science Journalist of the Year Award and the EFSJ will announce the laureates of the EFSJ Climate Grant.

21:00 - 21:10European Science Journalist of the Year Award Ceremony – Museum Boerhaave By EFSJ

The European Science Journalist of the Year Award will be announced by the EFSJ.

21:10 - 21:20EFSJ Climate Grant Laureates – Museum Boerhaave By EFSJ

Announcement of the laureates of the EFSJ Climate Grants.

The grant amount is a total of 12.000 euros. Depending on applications received, one to three projects may be awarded grants.

The grant is made possible by the EFSJ in partnership with BNP Paribas Foundation.

For more information, see:

09:45 - 10:00Grand Opening – Cleveringa Auditorium By VWNOpening

After two days of field trips and getting to know each other, it is time to open the official European Conference of Science Journalism Leiden 2022. Or: #ECSJ2022

10:00 - 11:00Keynote: Elisabeth Bik – Cleveringa Auditorium By Elisabeth BikInvestigate Science

Science integrity will always remain a work in progress. While peer-review is a necessary first step in safeguarding the quality and integrity of scientific research, the system has been proven to be far from perfect. Elisabeth Bik has pioneered a ‘forensic’ approach to quality control, by painstakingly checking images, mainly in biomedical publications, for duplications and other unacceptable ways of manipulation. She has identified hundreds of papers with serious flaws, resulting in many retractions.

Her criticism of high-profile researchers like Didier Raoult – who claimed hydroxychloroquine cured covid-19 – has made her the target of lawsuit threats and vicious personal attacks on social media. However, she has no intention of backing down in her quest to improve science integrity.

11:30 - 12:30How to recognise hoaxes in science journalism – Cleveringa Auditorium By Alexander PleijterWorkshop

Alexander Pleijter (Leiden University) is an expert in online journalism and fact checking. He is one of the coordinators of the Dutch ‘News checkers’-website www.nieuwscheckers.nl, a project that aims to help the public properly evaluate (online) news and to teach journalism students the skill of fact checking. At ECSJ he will talk about how to recognise hoaxes and fake news in science reporting.

12:35 - 13:20Lunch lecture by conference partner Universities of the Netherlands – Cleveringa Auditorium By Jacob JolijUniversities of the Netherlands

The Dutch research landscape

In conversation with Jacob Jolij.

Jacob Jolij is director of Research and Impact at the Association of Universities of The Netherlands. The Dutch research universities are known for their high quality education and research. During this lunch session you will learn more about the strength of the Dutch universities, the main research areas and the preconditions for successful science in the Netherlands. You can ask Jacob anything about the Dutch research landscape.

By our partner Universities of the Netherlands.

13:30 - 14:25Pandemic science reporting – when the professional becomes personal – Cleveringa Auditorium By Jop de VriezePanel discussion

Mostly, a science reporter zooms in on topics that are socially relevant but can be approached from a safe and comfortable distance. But a pandemic is not distant for any science reporter: we’ve all been in the middle of it. How can a science reporter work in an engaged and neutral way during such a crisis? And how desirable is it to be as neutral as possible when there is so much at stake and the science and it implications have become so value laden and political?

Speakers:  
Lise Barnéoud (Le Monde)
Heidi Ledford (Nature)
Kai Kupferschmidt (Science)
Sergio Pistoi (among others Scientific American and Reuters)

Moderator:
Jop de Vrieze

14:30 - 15:30Climate reporting: it’s not the end of the world? – Cleveringa AuditoriumPanel discussion

When reporting about climate science, should we use ‘global warming’ or ‘global heating’? Should we abandon all pretense of objectivity and say ‘climate disruption’ or ‘climate breakdown’ instead of ‘climate change’? Is activist climate reporting – which is now the official policy of the Guardian – exactly what the world needs, or should journalists still keep their distance from the politicised front line of climate science and its interpretations?

The speakers will debate this issue with each other, and with the audience.

Speakers: Maarten Keulemans, Bart Verheggen, Jacopo Pasotti

Moderator:
Desiree Hoving

16:00 - 17:00Grand finale & Closing remarks – Cleveringa AuditoriumFinale

During this final session we get together in the large auditorium to look back on the day. During this final session we get together in the large auditorium for a “State of Science Journalism” speech by Science’s International news editor Martin Enserink. Also together we reflect on this conference day in a fun and (inter)active way lead by quiz master Lucas Keijning.

Next, there’s time to rest or do some sightseeing in Leiden. In the evening we hope to see you all for the Grand closure with drinks and bites at Rijksmuseum Boerhaave!

11:30 - 12:30Mending the reproducibility crisis – B017 By Fabio TuronePanel discussion

This session will address the role of the media in discussing the issues related to the so-called “reproducibility crisis” in a constructive way. Panelists will present several critical aspects of this complex issue, and will reflect with the audience on the role that science journalists can have in helping citizens to notice not only the noise of the “falling trees” (the scandals involving lack of integrity and bad methodology) but also the much fainter noise of the growing “forest” of initiatives that are trying to fix the current system of incentives/disincentives that does not value reproducibility studies and instead often leaves room for rushed, hyped, unreliable research.

Discussion lead by Fabio Turone (Italy).

Speakers: Laura Fortunato (United Kingdom), Anne Scheel (The Netherlands), Ewout Steyenberg (the Netherlands)

13:30 - 14:25Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The Gender Issue – B017 By Rebecca ClearPanel discussion

Journalists play an essential role in bringing new scientific discoveries to the public. It is essential that they have a thorough understanding of how critical research has been designed, conducted and published, asking probing questions like: has sex and gender been integrated in this research? Are there cultural blindspots in this work? Do we have data on research output by gender, race or ethnicity?

As universities, funders and scientific publishers work to create a more inclusive research ecosystem, science journalists must keep pace with key issues around representation, intersectionality, bias and methodology to gain a deeper understanding of them as contributors to quality, the intellectual potential of research, the scientific talent pool and most importantly, societal impact.

This session will explore key issues and perspectives on gender and intersectionality, to equip and challenge science journalists as they interact with and report on the research.

This session is co-organized with Elsevier.

Speakers: Elizabeth Pollitzer, Adam Travis, Ilaria Cianchetta

Moderator:
Rebecca Clear (Elsevier)

14:30 - 15:30Inclusion in Research And Journalism: The North/South Dialogue – B017 By Rebecca ClearPanel discussion

Is Global South science under-reported? All too often, in the ‘Global North’, we only hear about crises happening in lower income countries, rather than coverage of the critical research being undertaken by scientists in areas that are most relevant to them. Which fields in particular are under-reported, how, and why? How does the research ecosystem and its biases play a role in this?

In this session we will explore the assumptions of, and challenges faced by, journalists from both the North and South, and possible responses.

Speakers: Ylann Schemm, Ashani Ranathunga, Ochieng Ogodo, Fiona Broom

Moderator:
Rebecca Clear (Elsevier)

11:30 - 12:30Behind the hype: Insights from science journalism research – B041 By Annemarie KerkhoffPanel discussion

Science journalism sometimes is criticized because it contains exaggerations about the potential of specific research results. This can happen, for example, when journalistic coverage states or implies that a drug that works in animals will also work in humans before this is tested, or when unsound science is covered without information about its limitations. Journalists, press officers at universities and publishers, and researchers often point to each other as the culprit. In what has been dubbed the ‘cycle of hype’, all parties involved have their own motives for communicating about science that go beyond simply informing the public (e.g. profit or visibility).

In this session, three researchers will discuss their perspectives and study findings about science journalism, highlighting the complexities of the (international) circulation of science news and shedding more light on pitfalls and their solutions. In the second part of the session, there will be a joint discussion between the audience and the speakers, gaining insights from all three parties involved (researchers, journalists, and press officers) to feed future research and promote better science coverage in the media. 

Speakers:
Elisa Nelissen (KU Leuven)
Sofie Verkest (Gent University)
Anne Dijkstra (University Twente)

Moderator: Annemarie Kerkhoff

13:30 - 14:25Meaningless death counts: what the WHO gets wrong every time – B041 By Arnout JaspersPresentation

Hardly a day goes by without reading in the media: ‘Y causes X deaths per year’, where Y can be air pollution, drinking or even noise. Science journalist Arnout Jaspers will show what is fundamentally wrong with this way of quantifying diffuse health effects on a population. There are better alternatives but even major organisations like the WHO ignore this and keep reporting meaningless death counts.

11:30 - 12:30On the trail of war crimes in Ukraine – C006 Mandela RoomPresentation

A member of the Meduza.io team will show how science journalism can be an aid for war reporting. The team used chronolocation to identify murders of civilians in Bucha by Russian forces.  

13:30 - 15:30Bellingcat workshop – C006 Mandela Room By BellingcatWorkshop

The journalism collective Bellingcat, founded by Eliot Higgins in 2014, pioneered online fact checking and open source intelligence (OSINT) methods to document, among other things, the downing of Malaysia Airlines MH17, the Skripal Poisoning, and weapons and war crimes in several wars, including the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Instructors Youri van der Weide and Annique Mossou wil deliver a 2 hour workshop detailing verification principles (verification and analysis of user generated content, such as photos and videos from social networks), maps and satellite services, and advanced OSINT search techniques.

Attention: bring your laptop. Attendance for actively participating journalists is limited to 30, workshop vouchers will be distributed on site during registration.

11:00 - 17:00Sungazing – Outside, restaurant terrace 2nd floor By Roel van der HeijdenStreet astronomy

Do you enjoy the Sun? It’s hot, it’s bright and it is responsible for beautiful summer sunsets.

On closer look our star has a lot more to offer than sunbathing. At the ECSJ Roel van der Heijden (freelance science journalist) will bring his self-built telescope to investigate our closest star (weather permitting). Maybe we’ll be able to see some sunspots on the surface of the Sun, and Roel will be happy to explain how he made his telescope and how he now uses it for astronomy outreach in his living room planetarium, the ‘Huiskamerplanetarium’ (www.huiskamerplanetarium.nl).

20:30 - 23:30Grand closure, drinks & bites – Museum Boerhaave (external location) By VWNGrand Closure

After a full conference day and maybe even two field trip days it’s time to contemplate together with your science journalist colleagues.

The closing drinks & bites will be hosted in the beautiful science museum Boerhaave with an amazing collection of ancient and modern artefacts which contributed to the advancement of science.

The museum hosts special tours during the evening.

The European Federation for Science Journalism will host two events, namely: the award ceremony for the European Science Journalist of the Year Award and the EFSJ will announce the laureates of the EFSJ Climate Grant.

21:00 - 21:10European Science Journalist of the Year Award Ceremony – Museum Boerhaave By EFSJ

The European Science Journalist of the Year Award will be announced by the EFSJ.

21:10 - 21:20EFSJ Climate Grant Laureates – Museum Boerhaave By EFSJ

Announcement of the laureates of the EFSJ Climate Grants.

The grant amount is a total of 12.000 euros. Depending on applications received, one to three projects may be awarded grants.

The grant is made possible by the EFSJ in partnership with BNP Paribas Foundation.

For more information, see:

  • C020 - Room 5
10:00 - 11:45EFSJ Annual General Meeting By Krijn SoetemanAGM

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